Wednesday, June 15, 2011

When To Say When?

Does there ever come a time in your writing when you get bored?  And not because your story is boring, although that can certainly be the case, but maybe you've been working on something so long, it becomes a chore.  Or maybe you come up with a new idea whilst in the midst of an old one.  Then what do you do?  How realistic is writing two completely different pieces at the same time?  Or more than two?  Can novels and short stories exist in the same universe that is a writer's mind?  At what point must you set one down to concentrate on the other?

The saving grace of the unpublished writer is the freedom to ditch something old for something new.  Or even ditching something new to go back to something old.  Either way, the passion better be strong, or everything is going to suffer. 

Does anyone else have these problems?

8 comments:

Ted Cross said...

I think that shiny new ideas are always more exciting than the slog through the middle of a novel, so what distinguishes a real writer is the ability to set aside those shiny new ideas temporarily and grind through the finish on the WIP.

edgeacuity said...

Agreed! I always find there's a point in a story when my interest wanes, my mind wanders, and I end up wishing I was writing all these new ideas rather than working on the one that's been knocking about in my head for so long that it's not that exciting anymore.

But I think giving up at that point would be a mistake, too.

Anne E. Johnson said...

I couldn't get anything finished if I didn't have multiple, wildly disparate projects going on at once. My brain thrives on that diversity.

April said...

I agree with what Ted said. It's so easy to get distracted by new, fresh ideas that are as shiny as new pennies. It's also easy to get caught up in life...and the longer you're kept away from your manuscript, the harder it is to get motivated to get back to it. For me, anyway. For example, I've recently been very productive with queries and writing...but this weekend is busy, and I probably won't get anything done. Then the next weekend...

It's like working out. You work out every day without fail. Then one day, you have plans and can't. The next day, you manage to justify skipping one more day...before you know it, it's been an entire week since you've hit the treadmill.

Jeanne said...

I like to have several projects going on at once, unless there is a deadline involved. I like the surprise of looking at something I did a while ago with fresh eyes. It gives me a lot of incentive.

I am concerned about your use of the word whilst however. Who says that?
Probably men in velour running suits.lol

MC Howe said...

Whilst I agree with most all of you, I must take exception to one thing. First, however, it certainly does keep the creative juices flowing to have new things on the mind. And you are absolutely right Jeanne. Looking at long forgotten things can be exciting. And if it was a good idea when you started writing, it probably still is halfway through.

Now to the exception. Take a good look at me sometime. Do I really look like a runner)

Travener said...

Oh, yeah, I have those problems. If I start to lose steam as I go along I lose faith in the idea, instead of just chalking it up to being in a rough patch. I absolutely can't work on two pieces of writing at the same time; never could, never will. I'm a one-ms. kind of guy.

By the way, what's up with this "whilst" stuff? Jeez, you're not a Brit hiding out in Florida, are you?

MC Howe said...

I'm not a Brit, but I have been there, as well as dozens of other countries. As such, I consider myself "Wordly.". This is why I watch Telly, park my car in a Gare-age and will push my kids around in a pram whilst they munch on crisps;)